Es que esa es una foto vieja…

Pregunta de gramática: (scroll down for discussion of answer)

What is the grammatical gender of the word “foto,” masculine or feminine?

Hint: look at the other words in the sentence that describe “foto.”

Vocabulario: (scroll down for answers)

la mariposa

la oruga

la licencia de conducir -o- el carnet de conducir

una foto vieja

In this comic, the words “esa, “una,” and “vieja all describe the word “foto,” and they all end in “a.”

That tells us that “foto” has a feminine grammatical gender even though it ends with the letter “o.” Any ideas why?

“La foto” is short for “la fotografía,” so it actually does end in “a” in its original form. Can you think of other words like this?

La moto = la motocicleta

La bici = la bicicleta

La compu = la computadora

¿Más ejemplos? If you think of any more examples, leave a comment to share with us!

Vocabulario:

la mariposa = the butterfly

la oruga = the caterpillar

la licencia de conducir -o- el carnet de conducir = the driver´s license

“La Gozadera” Song Activity (los países, las nacionalidades, las banderas)

la gozadera dancing flagThis activity is so fun! Students learn/practice Latin American country names, flags, and nationality terms while enjoying the upbeat song “La Gozadera.” You may choose to use only one part of this activity in your class, or all of them!

1. Hand out this activity sheet with the lyrics. (Click here for a free PDF). Instruct students to choose a country mentioned in the lyrics and draw the flag for that country.

(Click here for an answer key for the handout.)

2.Watch “La Gozadera” music video. As students watch the video, they should be listening out for their country to be mentioned. Each time their country is mentioned, they raise their flag.

3. Students complete the activity sheet by writing the nationality terms next to each country name.

4. Review answers and discuss lyrics and video.

5. Conversation: Students walk around the classroom with their flags to practice the following dialogue:

A: “¿De dónde eres?”

B: “Soy de    (país)   .”  -o- “Soy    (nacionalidad)   .”

Let me know if you try out this activity in your classroom! I´d love to know how it goes!

Also, we did this activity in my classroom to review nationality terms. I already introduced them using the song “Humano” by Lida Pimienta. Click here for my post about that including the lyrics video I made!

El panda inteligente: Mini-lectura interesante con preguntas de pensamiento crítico

Antes de leer:

¿Conoces estas palabras?:

(Haz clic para ver la definición en el dicciónario)

darse cuenta

embarazada

engañar

el comportamiento

Después de leer:

Responde a las siguientes preguntas con frases completas.

1. ¿Crees que este panda es inteligente o tramposo (o los dos)?

2. ¿Conoces una historia de un animal muy listo? ¿Qué hizo este animal? (Si no conoces una historia verdadera, ¡puedes inventar una historia creativa!)

Panda inteligente

¡Más!: Haz clic aquí para ver otro chiste sobre un guepardo listo…

 

Actividad: Diseñar un mensaje de cumpleaños atrasado (el “se” accidental) (el pretérito)

excusa_perfecta pret

Esta es la excusa perfecta para cuando se te olvida el cumpleaños de un amigo.

¿Puedes pensar en otros mensajes de cumpleaños atrasados creativos?

¡Diseña una carta, un meme, o un mensaje creativo!

Aquí hay unos ejemplos más…

cumpleaños mejor tardecumpleaños mono

tarjeta de cumpleañoscumpleanos ms piggyfeliz cumple mejor tarde que nunca

 

Spanish Vowel Pronunciation: My 3 Best Tips!

In this video I share the 3 tips I use to explain Spanish vowel pronunciation.

Follow up comprehension questions:

(1)What are the 5 vowels in Spanish?

(2) What is a tense vowel? Which vowels are tense in Spanish?

(3) What is an example of a vowel sound that we use in English but not in Spanish?

See below for answers.

1. A, E, I, O, U

2. Our muscles are more tense and engaged when we pronounce tense vowels. All vowels in Spanish are tense vowels (A, E, I, O, U).

3. Answers will very. Some include the “A” in “cAt,” the “I” in “kId” or  “fIt,” the “uh” in “bUg” or a relaxed pronunciation of “edUcation.”

I have found that when students are able to answer these questions about Spanish vowel pronunciation, they are able to analyze and self-correct their own pronunciation.

By answering these questions, students demonstrate that they know  which vowels to stick to, which vowel sounds to avoid, and physically how Spanish vowels are pronounced in contrast with the lax vowels in English pronunciation that so often interfere with their Spanish pronunciation.

This tense vs. lax distinction is superior to the “short” versus “long” vowel explanation commonly found in textbooks because it allows students to make a physical connection to the vowel pronunciation (by placing the hand on the cheek to feel the tense cheek muscles.)

Furthermore, vowel length is variable, so the “short” versus “long” distinction can be unclear and cause confusion.

Do you have any other tips you think should be included in Spanish vowel pronunciation instruction?